Dalmatian Island Hopping

Croatian islands

TAILOR-MADE FLEXIBLE ITINERARY TO EXPLORE DALMATIA

Itinerary for 12 days / 11 nights Visiting: Dubrovnik, Korcula, Hvar and Split   Dubrovnik
The Croatian Adriatic Coast with its 1185 islands, islets and reefs is one of the most impressive coastlines in Europe, finding a satisfactory way to fully explore this ravishing two thousand kilometre coastline in one holiday is impossible!  Dalmatia gives you an opportunity to visit major mainland cities and islands, some of these are situated on Roman remains and all are rich in architecture, history and local character. 


  
The roots of Dubrovnik go back to the early 7th century, when first Greek and then Roman refugees settled on the territory which is now the old city, naming it Ragusa.   later, they were joined by the Slavs who renamed the city Dubrovnik. ' Libertas' is the motto and St Blaise their patron saint.
After Byzantine power declined, Dubrovnik grudgingly recognised the supremacy of the Venetian Republic, its long time trading rival in the Adriatic.

   
At the first opportunity Dubrovnik freed itself from Venetian domination with the help of the increasingly powerful Hungarian - Croatian kings on the mainland.
In 1358 it became a self-governing city state with all the power concentrated in the hands of a land-owning  oligarchy  who continued to  govern until 1808, when  the city state was formally dissolved by Napoleon. In spite of many futile attempts by its citizens to regain their independence, the short French rule was replaced in 1814 by Austrian rule. This  continued until 1918 when the city was incorporated into the newly formed Yugoslav State.
This Beautiful preserved medieval  city is undeniably one of  Europe’s most picturesque holiday destinations.

 

 


KORCULA

 For many years Korcula has been welcoming British visitors who appreciate this idyllic oasis of peace and beauty. The Greeks, who gave it the name of  Korkyra Melaine for its dark and densely wooded appearance, first settled the island.
Korcula Town is a  well planned little walled medieval town built in locally quarried stone renowned world wide for its whiteness.  Among many beautiful buildings clad in this white stone is the Agia Sophia in Istanbul. From 1420 to 1797 the island was a dependency of Venice, with self-governing status. After Venice, Austria, France and the British held the island (from 1813-15).  Korcula’s inhabitant's claims that the city was birthplace of Marco Polo.  

                                       

Hvar Town


A long and narrow intensely beautiful island whose air is filled with the fragrances of lavender, rosemary and laurel. Hvar is blessed by such a good climate that it is nicknamed ‘ the Madeira of the Croatian Adriatic'.   The town of Hvar, is dominated by the Piazza with St Stephen’s Cathedral and has some exquisite public buildings with delicate stone carved facades. Among these is the arched Venetian arsenal. The upper  storey of the arsenal used to house the oldest theatre in Croatia  and one of  the first in Europe. It was opened in 1612 and  its auditorium is still intact  . 


 

SPLIT

 

The largest Dalmatian city and site of the former palace complex of  the Roman emperor Diocletian. 

Although the core of old medieval Split is within the walls of the Palace, many of the original architectural features are well preserved and recognisable. This is the site that inspired the eighteenth century Scottish architect Robert Adam to introduce the  "Georgian" style to Britain.
Many of the buildings of that period which grace London, Bath and Bristol have elements of architecture inspired from his visit to the Palace of Diocletian.

 

Roman emperor Diocletian. palace remains


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